Mediterranean Diet: Seafood

Posted on May 11th, 2018
While red meat is limited on the Mediterranean Diet, seafood is actually encouraged. Try to eat seafood or fish two times weekly. These lean proteins allow for more of the fresh fruits and vegetables, beans and legumes and healthy fats to forge to the forefront of your diet.

What is is the big deal about seafood and fish?

Seafood and fish provide Omega-3 fatty acids. They also provide essential amino acids and vitamins… Vitamins A and C and magnesium to name a few. Omega-3 fatty acids are important in heart health. They can help reduce the risk of heart disease and aid with lipid management. They are also helpful in reducing inflammation. Some other benefits are they help with fetal and baby development. They are also great for our brain, decreasing symptoms of depression, Alzheimer’s and ADHD.
To incorporate fish and seafood into your weekly menu, it is helpful to know what you are looking for and how to choose the best piece of fish to prepare. If you are buying the whole fish, the first thing to look at is the eyes. They should be completely clear and plump. The flesh should be cold and wet , but not sticky or have any visible films present. Fins should be intact. For cut fish, white fish should be opaque and white. Red fish like salmon and tuna should have a bright vibrant color. Flesh should also spring back when pushed in slightly. Finally, there should be a light ocean scent, not a “fishy” smell.
Now that you know how to choose your fish and seafood, here are some that are higher in Omega 3 fatty acids and some tasty recipes to try.

Trout

Shrimp

Sardines

http://www.cultivatebeauty.com.au/sardine-fish-cakes-recipe/ BONUS: Sardines also provide extra calcium as the bones of the fish are also consumed.

Salmon

Lobster

Blog post orginailly created on the Reasor’s Healthy Living Facebook page.
Information included does not constitute medical advice and should only be used as a general recommendation for a healthy, balanced diet and lifestyle. Reasor’s Registered Dietitian opinions and recommendations are her own; she is not paid to endorse any products or services.